Dogs Also Lie Awake At Night Thinking About Their Problems

“Ever lay awake late at night, eyes wide open in the pitch-black dark, wondering if Maddy in sales really meant “nothing” by “I like your shirt, I almost bought it myself,” or if she actually meant what she absolutely did mean, which is “f*** you, idiot, that shirt is horrible, why did you even get out of bed today?” Of course you do. You’re human. Worrying before, during, and just after sleep is what we do.

Turns out it’s not exclusive to us, though: Much like humans, it would appear dogs are also kept awake at night by their worries.

A recent Hungarian study published by the Royal Society scientific journal showed that dogs experience disturbed sleep patterns when stressed. That’s right, planet Earth. Your beloved puppies and doggies are worried, and they can’t sleep, and there’s nothing you can do about it.

The study measured the sleep experiences of dogs who were exposed to either positive or negative emotional experiences pre-sleep, like being affectionately touched by their owners, or approached by an intimidating stranger. The results showed dogs who were exposed to positive experiences had a deeper and more consistent sleep, while dogs who were stressed before sleep were prone to waking up, staying in REM sleep, and generally having a shitty night’s sleep.

Interestingly, though, on average dogs who had negative experiences pre-sleep were quicker to actually fall asleep than other dogs, which scientists say is very much in line with human behavior. Like how you often desperately want to power off at the end of a terrible day and just shut your physical self off.

So there you have it. First we learn dogs don’t like hugs, then we’re not allowed to sleep next to them in bed (actually fair), and now dogs are stressed at night.”

The full article and related studies are posted below.

An Avoidable Tragedy – RIP Mocha

An innocent life was tragically cut short today. Another life will most likely be ended as a result.

An innocent life was taken as his mom tried in vain to use her own body to shield him from the attack taking place. Unfortunately, her body was no match for the 150 pound attacker that had prey in its sights. Mocha’s mom is an experienced owner who did everything right and still could not prevent this tragedy.

Please, if you take your dogs out in public, always keep them leashed and make sure you are in control of the leash at all times! This goes for big and little dogs alike. Keep a firm latch on the leash not only to control your dogs behavior, but also to be able to snatch your dog out of harms way in the blink of an eye. If you have a big, strong dog and you are going to be someplace unfamiliar or stressful, take extra precautions. Use a no-pull harness, double tether, or even just using a carabiner with a double handle leash and attach one handle to a belt ring on your pants as back up. Please take that extra precaution to avoid tragedies like this. Also, if you are using a retractable leash on any animal larger than a hamster, STOP! No one has enough control over this type of leash to be able to prevent accidents in a split second!

Don’t be the “not my dog” owner that believes their dog will not attack out of no where because they never have before. Or the “not my dog” owner that thinks because their dog is little, cute, and doesn’t leave their side that these guidelines don’t apply to them. This is especially important when you are with your dog in unfamiliar surroundings or someplace that is noisy and “scary” for our four footed friends.

As small dog owners, we are just as accountable to safe guarding and keeping control of our Poms as our friends who have large dogs. All of us in the dog community need to participate in preventing events like this that can be avoided.

Show Breeder vs. Backyard Breeder

We are often asked why someone’s pom doesn’t look a certain way, why they are so big? Not fluffy? Why they are so expensive from breeders? how come their coat is flat and silky?  Why their snout is so long? and many others…

You don’t have to pay $3,000 for a pet pom, but you should always find a reputable breeder.  “Backyard breeders” tend to care more about the dollars involved and not the health of the breed in general.  Some are well meaning in wanting to breed their beloved pet, but we discourage this as there are so many Poms in rescues and shelters all over the country.  Reputable breeders can not only show you the parents, but also tend to know the lineage back several generations of each litter they breed.

Understanding Double Coated Dogs

Double coated dogs refer to the animals that, like Huskies, have two layers of fur. The first, or undercoat, are the fine, fluffy hairs that are short and crimp (closest to the skin). It’s the fur that sheds; light and soft. This layer is excellent at trapping air and insulating the dog. Essentially it keeps them warm in the winter, and cool in the summer.

The topcoat is made up of tougher guard hairs that don’t shed, and protect your pet from the sun’s harmful rays and bug bites. It actually insulates them from the heat. What this means is: do not shave your double coated dog. It’s a mistake to think you’re helping your animal stay cool, particularly in summer, when evolution has provided them exactly what they need to survive. By stripping them of their natural ability to heat and cool themselves, you could be doing more harm than good.

A key piece of understanding in this matter is that, unlike humans; dogs do not cool themselves through their skin. At most, it is only the pads of their paws that sweat. Their main mode of cooling comes from panting.

Some other common reasons folks shave their doubled coated dogs are the thinking that the animal will stop shedding. Pooches with undercoats shed, no two ways about it. But even after a shave, while the hair may be shorter, it can still shed.

Another is, “it’ll always grow back”. Sometimes it will, other times it won’t. The older the pooch is, the less likely it is that the topcoat of guard hairs will grow back. This leaves them with the undercoat, giving them a patchy, scruffy look. It can alter their coat for the rest of the dog’s life.

Not only does it look bad, but you can end up having to shave the hair continuously from then on and once again, you strip them of their natural ability to protect themselves.

In conclusion, when you shave a double coated dog, you may irreparably impair their ability to properly heat/cool themselves and protect their skin. The best way to keep this kind of dog cool and comfortable is to regularly bathe and brush them. The only reason a person might need to shave their double coated dog is if the hair is so matted, it’s the only option.

Bailey – one year after being shaved. This is all the growth that returned. He is brushed and poofed up here. His coat is patchy and his guard hairs are non-existent. He was only shaved once by necessity.

Bailey

Romeo was shaved a few times from ages 4-6. He is now 10 and has a wonderful coat.

This actually gave me chest pains my heart hurt so bad!

Pet Feeding Reminder Gadgets

Interesting little gadgets…

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Dog Food Reminder on Amazon

Pet Feeding Reminder on Amazon