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3 Things All Pomeranian Owners Should Know

via 3 Things All Pomeranian Owners Should Know – iHeartDogs.com

#1 – That Coat Needs Grooming

The Pom coat is high maintenance. Frequent brushing is required to prevent mats. Owners also need to watch for skin issues that hide under all that fur, such as hot spots or dry skin. Pomeranians are prone to flaky skin, so it’s something that needs to be monitored. They should not be shaved except for medical reasons, as the Pomeranian coat is designed to regulate body temperature.

#2 – Fragile Bodies

While many Poms act like they are Great Danes, their tiny bodies are actually quite fragile. They are prone to issues such as luxating patellas and their tracheas are easily damaged. Jumping from the couch can cause broken limbs; jumping from your arms can be fatal. Harnesses are safer when walking than a collar. Owning a Pomeranian means taking extra care that he doesn’t get hurt.

#3 – They Need Socializing

Often described as having a Napoleon complex, Pomeranians can be very territorial. If they have not had training and proper socialization, your Pom will be a nuisance barker that feels it’s his duty to protect your home from anything that comes by, including the garbage man, friends, family or the neighbor’s cat.

Written by Kristina Lotz

 

Giving This To Your Pom Could Help Skin Allergies

via Giving This To Your Pomeranian Daily Could Help Alleviate Painful Skin Allergies – iHeartDogs.com

Common Allergens for Pomeranians

  • Pollen
  • Grass
  • Food (such as wheat, chicken or soy)
  • Medications (penicillin, opiates, etc.)
  • Perfumes
  • Shampoos and other cleaning products
  • Latex

Allergies are a hypersensitive and damaging response of the immune system to external allergens, such as pollen and food. It’s the same for humans and dogs. However, with dogs the signs and symptoms may go unnoticed because our furry friends can’t tell us what’s wrong. So as the leader of the pack, we need to be hyperaware of what to look out for.

Common Allergy Signs & Symptoms in Pomeranians

  • Dry, itchy skin (possible scabs or sores)
  • Excessive scratching, biting or licking on skin
  • Watery eyes
  • Paw chewing
  • Nasal discharge
  • Chronic ear infections
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Sneezing
  • Breathing issues (very serious sign!)

Fortunately, there are ways to help boost your dog’s immune system and decrease the effects of allergies. Omega fatty acids are a major benefit in the fight against allergies and degenerative disorders that can cause inflammation and arthritis. Some research has shown that Omega’s can even prevent allergies from developing in puppies. While every dog is different, there is no argument that your pup could benefit from Omega fatty acids. But here’s the catch…dogs can’t produce Omega’s on their own, so they must get them somewhere else.

The Problem: Dogs Can’t Produce Vital Omega Fatty Acids

There are many sources of essential Omega fatty acids. Some mistakenly believe that dog food delivers all your dog needs. Unfortunately, because Omega’s are susceptible to heat, most of the benefits become biologically unavailable to your dog due to the cooking/treatment temperatures of dog food.

That’s why I personally give my dog an Omega supplement. They really seem to like the Omega-3 Select chews from Project Paws. I like them because they’re made from anchovies and krill, which have some of the highest concentrations of Omega’s of any fish. Because these are small fish with a shorter lifespan, they don’t contain the high level of toxins like other large fish like Salmon. The other reason I love them is because each purchase of Omega-3 Select chews provides meals for up to 21 shelter dogs.

10 Signs Your Dog Has a Yeast Infection

via 10 Signs Your Dog Has a Yeast Infection | petMD

Signs of Yeast Infections in Dogs

Changes in color and texture

Signs of a yeast infection can vary depending on the site of the infection. “The biggest sign is alteration in the appearance of the skin,” Marrinan says. A pink or red color is commonly seen in the early stages of infection. With chronic infection, the skin can become leathery, thick, and gray or black. Remember that yeast infections can occur in a number of places on your dog’s body if conditions are right, he notes.

Greasy skin

Excessively oily or greasy skin is another common symptom of a yeast infection in dogs, according to Loft.

Scaly skin

Some dogs with yeast infections develop crusting, scaling, or flakiness of the skin that can look a little like dandruff, says Dr. Jennifer Coates, veterinary advisor for petMD.

Head shaking

“The ears are far and away the most common location for a yeast infection,” Marrinan says. In such cases, you likely will notice your dog trying to relieve his discomfort by repeatedly shaking or tilting his head.

Scratching and rubbing

Your dog also might be quite itchy from the yeast infection. You may see him scratching the affected spot, rubbing up against furniture or another surface, or scooting along the floor, Marrinan says.

Licking

Some dogs might attempt to relieve itchy discomfort by incessantly licking the infected area, the doctors note.

Swelling and warmth

While redness and itching are the first signs of a yeast infection, symptoms can easily progress to swelling, warmth, and pain in the infected area, according to Marrinan.

Odor

Odor also is a common sign of a yeast infection, regardless of location, Loft says. “Some people claim the yeast-infected skin and ears smell like Cheetos or have a sweet smell, but this is typically not a reliable ‘test,’ as we often find certain bacterial infections can have a similar odor,” he says. “It is important to remember this can be seen with other infectious organisms beyond yeast, so diagnostic testing at the veterinarian’s office is required.”

Hair loss

Hair loss can accompany the yeast infection and associated inflammation, Loft says.

Drooling

A yeast infection in a dog’s mouth is extremely rare but can cause abnormal drooling, oral discomfort, and problems eating. Excessive drooling can also be a sign of other problems in the mouth, such as an abscessed tooth or bee sting, Marrinan says, so pet parents should take their dog to the vet to determine the cause.

Treating Yeast Infections in Dogs

The most important aspect of treating a yeast infection in dogs is identifying and addressing the underlying cause. This will make the risk of relapse less of a concern, Loft and Marrinan agree. For deep and generalized skin and paw/claw bed infections, veterinarians may prescribe oral antifungal medications such as ketoconazole, fluconazole, or terbinafine, Loft says. Ears can be treated topically with appropriate ear cleaners and medications, but severe ear infections may also require oral medications. Bathing the skin and fur with disinfecting and degreasing shampoos can also help, Marrinan adds. The best treatment regimen can be determined by a veterinarian familiar with the specifics of the dog’s case.