This is a great video and article about yeast infections…

Here are some excerpts:

Signs and Symptoms of a Yeasty Dog 

…Yeast has a very characteristic odor. Some people think it smells like moldy bread; others liken the odor to cheese popcorn or corn chips. In fact, some people refer to a yeast infection of a dog’s paws as ‘Frito Feet.’ It’s a pungent, musty, unpleasant smell. The odor of a yeast infection is not a normal doggy odor. Healthy dogs don’t have a ‘doggy odor.’ So if your pup has stinky paws or musty-smelling ears, chances are she’s dealing with a yeast overgrowth.

Another sign your dog is yeasty is scratching. Yeast overgrowth is tremendously itchy. If it’s a problem with her paws, she won’t be able to leave them alone. The same goes for her ears. A lot of butt scooting can also be a clue. If your dog is spending a lot of time digging at herself to relieve intense itching, take heed. Whether it’s a bacterial or yeast infection, she needs your help to solve the problem.”

Step #1 in Clearing a Yeast Infection: Address the Diet 

Yeast needs sugar as a source of energy. Carbohydrates break down into sugar. Both MDs and veterinarians advise patients with yeast to get the sugars out of their diets. Dietary sugar isn’t just the white kind added to many pet treats and some pet foods. There are ‘secret,’ hidden forms of sugar that can also feed yeast overgrowth, for instance, honey. Although honey can be beneficial for pets in some cases, it does provide a food source for yeast. So if your dog is yeasty, you’ll need to carefully read his pet food and treat labels and avoid any product containing honey, high fructose corn syrup, and even white potatoes and sweet potatoes.

If your dog has a significant yeast problem, I recommend you go entirely sugar-free. Feed lowglycemic veggies. Eliminate potatoes, corn, wheat, rice – all the carbohydrates need to go away in a sugar-free diet. This is really an important step. I wish I could tell you yeast is easy to treat and avoid without addressing diet, but it isn’t. Your pet needs to eat a diet that helps keep his normal flora levels healthy and balanced.

The second thing I recommend is adding some natural anti-fungal foods to his diet, like a small amount of garlic or oregano. These foods are both anti-fungal and anti-yeast and can be beneficial in helping reduce the yeast level in your dog’s body.”

Anti-Yeast Baths and Rinses

If your dog has yeast overgrowth on her skin, I recommend disinfecting her entire body with a natural, anti-fungal shampoo. And yes, you can do this as often as necessary. It’s no longer true that you shouldn’t bathe dogs regularly. There are now plenty of safe shampoos on the market that will not over dry your pet’s skin or damage her coat.

I don’t recommend you use oatmeal-based shampoos. Oatmeal is a grain which provides a food source for that yeast on your dog’s skin. Use an anti-fungal shampoo made from, for example, tea tree oil or an herbal blend. These will help control the amount of yeast growing on your pet. I also recommend anti-fungal rinses during the summer months, from one to three times per week after shampooing. I use a gallon of water with a cup of vinegar or a cup of lemon juice. You can also use 20 drops of peppermint oil.”

“For Dogs with Stubborn or Recurring Yeast Infections 

For many dogs, yeast problems are seasonal. When the temperature and humidity levels rise each year, they get yeasty and stinky. If this is the case with your dog, the summer months are when you’ll need to be vigilant about disinfecting your pet and addressing any dietary issues that might be contributing to the problem. However, if your dog has year-round yeast problems – whether it’s 90 degrees outside or the dead of winter – you should be thinking about potential immune system issues. If your dog is overwhelmed with an opportunistic pathogen like yeast, it’s likely his immune system isn’t operating at 100 percent.”

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